Easy Home Chips (Fries)

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15. cold oil chips

Easy Home Chips (Fries)

I used to have a fear of deep frying. And then I discovered this simple technique for making the most wonderful potato chips (fries).

per person:
takes: 30 minutes

1 potato
oil to cover

1. Scrub potato and slice into your preferred chip shape. Pat dry with paper towel and place in a large saucepan.

2. Cover with oil and place over a medium high to high heat. Bring to an energetic simmer and let them cook away without touching them.

3. After 5-10 minutes when the chips start to go a little brown, you can give them a stir to remove any stuck to the bottom of the pan.

4. Continue to simmer rapidly until they’re a good chip colour. 15-25 minutes all up.

5. Scoop out with a slotted spoon and drain briefly on a rack or cake cooler above a tray of paper towel.

6. Sprinkle generously with salt and eat asap.

Variations

potatoes – floury varieties such as sebago, king edward or idaho are best for giving that super crisp exterior and fluffy centre. But that being said, waxy potatoes have great flavour. There’s no reason why other root veg like sweet potato or parsnip wouldn’t work. I just haven’t tried.

oil
– my current favourite oil for frying is rice bran oil. Peanut oil is also good. Anything that is stable at high temperatures (also called a ‘high smoke point’) is ideal. Avoid olive oil unless you like weird olivey flavoured chips.

2 step frying – if you prefer to make your chips in advance that can easily be done. Cook until the oclour is only just starting to brown. Then remove from the oil and cool on a rack. When you’re ready to reheat, cook in hot oil until they go a deeper golden colour.

Waste Avoidance Strategy

potatoes – will keep for months in the pantry in a brown paper bag or hessian sack to protect from the light and allow them to breathe. Avoid plastic bags as they can encourage the potatoes to sweat and go green and no body likes sweaty spuds! If your potatoes have gone green, you’ll need to throw them out.

oil – keeps in the pantry.

Leftover Potential?

OK if you like cold chips. See the ‘2 step’ process above if you’d like to cook ahead of time.

Problem Solving Guide

too bland – season with salt & pepper. Next time try a different variety of potato.

falling apart – probably a sign that you’ve tried to stir them too early, before they start to form a crust. Next time resist the urge until you’re sure they’re starting to brown.

burning
– the colour can go from pale golden to burnt surprisingly quickly. Make sure you keep a close watch on them.

greasy – if the temperature doesn’t rise quickly enough the chips can go a little soggy. Next time use a more aggressive heat.

undercooked inside – either you’ve cut the chips too fat or the temperature was too high so the outsides cooked before the heat reached the middles.

Serving Suggestions

I love them with lots of sea salt and a good quality mayo on the side. Great anywhere you’d normally have chips.
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7 Comments

  • Hi Jules
    One thing that stops me from trying this recipe is how to eventually dispose of the oil. It can’t go down the drain. I think it can be recycled but I don’t know where. Do I seal it in a little jar and put it in the rubbish? Do I dig a hole in the garden and bury it? What do you do with it?
    Virginia

    • I usually mix it in with my chicken food. Or I seal it in a little jar in the rubbish. It’s a big reason I don’t fry very often either 🙂

  • After trying these fries, I didn’t want to throw out all that oil, so I saved it and used it the next night to make yam fries. The yam fries were much chewier than the regular potato fries, and were slightly sweet. Quite good.

    • Great Susan
      i haven’t tried with yams or sweet potato but have been meaning to do so.

      I reuse my oil a few times but be careful if it starts to smell funny make sure you throw it out. The more it’s exposed to heat the less stable it is.

      Jx

  • It seems like I could go through a lot of oil with this recipe. I don’t usually fry, so I don’t know the protocol. Do you typically save the used oil? In the refrigerator? Or do you somehow throw it out?

    • Great question Holly. I just keep it in the pantry, strain out and leftover particles first. And then reuse 4-5 times before throwing out

  • Definitely keep a close eye on the chips – mine were way overdone by 15 minutes (total cooking time)! But I love that I now know how to make homemade chips:)

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